Diabetic Index Table

Monica Reinagel (www.inflammationfactor.com) came up with the idea of an InflammationFactor. This is a number which describes how inflammatory a food might be. She has classified some 2500 foods with this index. But she will not reveal how the index is calculated. So it is of little scientific value. It is useful for determining which foods to eat and which to avoid however. But we can do better. So we have collated all the data from the US and UK and Australian and Norwegian national food databases and made 3 different indices of 16,593 food types. From these you can determine which foods to eat and which to avoid - whether you are diabetic or not! The data came from...

1. The USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference release SR28 September 2015. 
2. The UK government composition of foods integrated data set (CoFID McChance and Widdowson March 25th 2015) 
3. The Australian Food Supplement and Nutrient Database (AUSNUT 2011-2013), from Food Standards Australia and New Zealand. But we reworded the food names to make them more directory friendly.
4. The Norwegian Food Safety Authority Matvaretabellen - August 2016

These government databases are not perfect. The UK database has no fibre. And only has comprehensive data (when errors and ommissions are fixed) for 566 records out of 2898. USDA database has 8688 records but is missing a lot of trans fat data which is critical. The Australian Database is the best with 5740 records.  But it has no palmitoleic, oleic, palmitic, stearic or arachidic fat breakdown. The Norwegian database has 1600 records but also does not break down saturated or mono unsaturated fats.

Search the Index - The higher the number, the worse the food is for you and the more insulin resistance it will cause

The indices are defined as follows...

Fat Chemical Formula Norm: Effect on the Insulin Resistance of Normal people (Index per gram) Diab: Effect on the Insulin Resistance of Diabetic people (Index per gram)
Capric Acid 10:0  1.0 1.0 
Lauric Acid 12:0  1.8 1.8 
Myristic Acid 14:0  0.7  0.7 
Pentadecanoic Acid 15:0  -1 -1
Palmitic Acid 16:0  1.2 1.2
Margaric Acid 17:0  -1.6 -1.6
Stearic Acid  18:0  0.3 0.3
Arachidic Acid 20:0  -1 -1
Behenic Acid 22:0  -1 -1
Lignoceric Acid 24:0  -1 -1
Trans Fats (natural/artificial average)   1.5 1.5
Palmitoleic Acid 16:1ω7  -0.6 -0.6
Oleic Acid 18:1ω9  0.3 0.3 (change this due to increased D9D?)
Linoleic Acid 18:2ω6  0.2 0.7 (due to increased D5D and D6D)
Arachidonic Acid (ARA)  20:4ω6  1 1
α Linolenic Acid 18:3ω3  -0.2 -0.2
EPA 20:5ω3  -2 -2
DPA 22:5ω3  -1 -1
DHA 22:6ω3  -2 -2
Fibre   -0.2 -0.2
Carb   0.2 above 50g/100 0.8 above 5g/100
Sugar   0.1 above 25g/100 0.2 above 1g/100
Protein   0 0.4 above 10g less 2xCarb/100. For Carb < 5
0.4  for Carb >= 5

The results of applying these formula to the 4 national databases are in our fairly definitive 16,416 Food Inflammation and Insulin Resistance Table. The Australians and Norwegians do not categorize the saturated or mono fats. So we had to treat all sat fats as bad (+0.9 per gram) and all mono fats as not so bad (0.4 per gram) for their data. But it still yields a very useful result.

Food Source Norm Diab 
Kcal Carb Prot Sugar Fibre Fat Sat Mono Poly Trans 10:0 12:0 14:0 15:0 16:0 17:0 18:0 20:0 22:0 24:0 ω3 ω6 ω7 ω9 EPA DHA
Salmon oil US -43.89 -43.89 902 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 19.90 29.00 40.30 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.28 0.00 9.84 0.00 4.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 38.10 1.54 4.82 17.00 13.00 18.20
Menhaden oil US -25.11 -25.11 902 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 30.40 26.70 34.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 7.96 0.00 15.10 0.00 3.77 0.00 0.00 0.00 30.90 2.15 10.50 14.50 13.20 8.56
Sardine oil US -12.82 -12.82 902 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 29.90 33.80 31.90 0.00 0.00 0.10 6.53 0.00 16.60 0.00 3.89 0.00 0.00 0.00 27.10 2.01 7.51 14.80 10.10 10.70
Fish Oil Triple Strength Omega 3 GR 902 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 8.97 8.97 81.95 0.00 0.00 0.10 6.53 0.00 16.60 0.00 3.89 0.00 0.00 0.00 77.15 4.8 3.09 5.88 50.0 19.8

Molecular distillation selects on carb chain length so concentrating the EPA and DHA also concentrates the DPA which is generally around 20% of the EPA or DHA (10% of the sum of both) and ω6 will be 7% of ω3. 

So 1360 mg with 680mg EPA and 270mg DHA will have around 100mg DPA and 66mg ω6 the remaining 244mg will be split 122 sat and 122 mono split 2:1 so 42 ω7 and 80 ω
So 100 g gives 50g EPA and 19.8g DHA, 7.35 g DPA , 8.97g sat fat and 8.97g mono (3.09 ω7 and 5.88 ω9) and 4.8g ω

Krill Oil can be better than Fish oil

In a human study, Bunea et al compared the effect of krill oil and fish oil on blood lipids, specifically total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, and HDL. Krill oil was given at dosages of 1g/d, 1.5g/d, 2g/d or 3g/d, and fish oil was given at a single dose of 3g/d. The authors found the following - https://chriskresser.com/the-definitive-fish-oil-buyers-guide/ 

1. Krill oil at a daily dose of 1g, 1.5g, 2g or 3g achieved significant reductions of LDL of 32%, 36%, 37% and 39% respectively. Patients treated with 3g fish oil daily did not achieve a significant reduction in LDL.
2. HDL was significantly increased in all patients receiving Krill Oil. HDL increased 44% at 1g/d, 43% at 1.5g/d, 55% at 2g/d and 59% at 3g/d. Fish oil taken at 3g/d increased HDL by only 4%.
3. Krill Oil did not decrease triglycerides significantly at 1g and 1.5g. However, Krill Oil reduced triglycerides by 28% at 2g/d and 27% at 3g/d. Fish oil at 3g/d did not achieve a significant reduction of triglycerides.
4. Blood glucose levels were reduced by 6.3% in patients receiving 1g/d and 1.5g/d of Krill Oil, and 5.6% in patients receiving 2g/d and 3g/d of Krill Oil. A daily dose of 3g of fish oil reduced blood glucose by 3.3%.

1 gram of Krill oil per day seems like a very good idea.